Impulsive Recollections

records, ramblings and things
I caught wind recently that some sad soul recently decided to sell his entire record collection consisting of there or around 1,200 jazz albums. The description was ambiguous to say the least, albeit the words “free” and “spiritual” we’re used, no doubt sparking my intrigue. I was a little bit ecstatic, so like any proper jazz fiend worth his own salt, I arrived bright and early with digging partner in tow. There were a few heads at the door already. A couple of opportunists no doubt ready to pounce on whatever Strata East or Black Jazz gem they could score, and flip on Ebay ten fold, some casual diggers not too concerned, and a few people just ready to grab any Herbie Hancock or Miles Davis joint they could find. I hit the ‘S’ section hard immediately pulling just about every Pharoah Sanders record you could want sans a slightly beat ‘Karma’. It was neck and neck, shoulder to shoulder within minutes. Everyone was unearthing crazy things left and right, and I can recall glancing to my sides with a smile and a playful bit of jealousy, happy that dudes were scoring their wants, and part of the joy of digging. This is my crowning achievement from the day, Abdul Rahim Ibrahim (or Doug Carn) to Black Jazz records fans, ‘Cry of the Floridian Tropic Son’. The original private pressing on Tablighi from 1977, and a perfect document of when spiritual jazz and disco would come together in the late 70s to make some of the most killer grooves of that decade. If you dig the Stanton Davis’ Ghetto Mysticism record or ‘Butterfly Island’ by The Fabiano Orchestra, then this is without a doubt up your alley. One of the best rare groove records from the 75-80 era.

I caught wind recently that some sad soul recently decided to sell his entire record collection consisting of there or around 1,200 jazz albums. The description was ambiguous to say the least, albeit the words “free” and “spiritual” we’re used, no doubt sparking my intrigue. I was a little bit ecstatic, so like any proper jazz fiend worth his own salt, I arrived bright and early with digging partner in tow. There were a few heads at the door already. A couple of opportunists no doubt ready to pounce on whatever Strata East or Black Jazz gem they could score, and flip on Ebay ten fold, some casual diggers not too concerned, and a few people just ready to grab any Herbie Hancock or Miles Davis joint they could find. I hit the ‘S’ section hard immediately pulling just about every Pharoah Sanders record you could want sans a slightly beat ‘Karma’. It was neck and neck, shoulder to shoulder within minutes. Everyone was unearthing crazy things left and right, and I can recall glancing to my sides with a smile and a playful bit of jealousy, happy that dudes were scoring their wants, and part of the joy of digging. This is my crowning achievement from the day, Abdul Rahim Ibrahim (or Doug Carn) to Black Jazz records fans, ‘Cry of the Floridian Tropic Son’. The original private pressing on Tablighi from 1977, and a perfect document of when spiritual jazz and disco would come together in the late 70s to make some of the most killer grooves of that decade. If you dig the Stanton Davis’ Ghetto Mysticism record or ‘Butterfly Island’ by The Fabiano Orchestra, then this is without a doubt up your alley. One of the best rare groove records from the 75-80 era.

  1. hyperdub813 posted this